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Is Your Pug a Senior?

December 15, 2018

We like to give useful and informative information about our Pug puppies for sale and what you can expect having one as your pet.

As you know, we all get older and age and it’s a natural part of life’s process. Because dogs age differently than humans, sometimes it’s hard to quite distinguish when they are technically seniors or not. We’ve put together a list of things to look for when trying to determine their seniority, so to speak!

Check for hearing and vision changes.

Older dogs tend to experience a gradual loss of hearing. If you notice that one of the Pug puppies for sale that you purchased long ago stops responding to your commands, they may be experiencing a hearing loss which is associated with older age. Regarding their vision, if you notice that they are bumping into things when they walk, that may be a sign of sight loss. That, in addition to, cloudiness in their eyes, is also a sign.

Check their skin and coat.

Just like with humans, older dogs have digestive systems that don’t absorb or digest nutrients from their meals as efficiently as in the past. Have you noticed gray hairs sprouting up and about on your pup? If so, you’ll likely see the grays appearing mostly on their muzzle and around their eyes. Though when you purchased one of the Pug puppies for sale they didn’t have much hair, as they age it can start to thin out, become coarse, and dry. Be on the lookout for (extra) wrinkles on your Pug’s skin, too!

Check for behavioral changes.

There was something special that made you get one of those precious Pug puppies for sale. Perhaps it was how it stood out from the rest of the bunch or it was simply a connection you made and felt. Back then, you paid attention to your potential pup’s behavior. As they age, continue to do the same. Keep note of things that may be changing, because they can be very subtle in the beginning. Pay attention the following:

Check their mobility.

Senior dogs will most likely have reduced mobility. Your dog may be experiencing joint pain and the early stages of osteoarthritis. Various symptoms include limping, walking slowly, the refusal to walk up or down steps, and a lack of appetite.

As pet owners, your job consists of caring for your pup through all stages of life. As your dog gets older, your responsibility of physical and behavioral awareness increases. Take care of your senior dog with the same love and care as when they were puppies. Continue to shower them with cuddles and affection.

 

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